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Gravatar: Weselina Angelow, WSBI

A journey in making small scale savings work

18.04.2016Weselina Angelow, WSBI

By the end of 2020, all 110 WSBI members set an ambitious plan. They aim to reach 1.7 billion customers and 400 million new transaction accounts by then. The work really kicks off this year, starting from a base level of 1.4 billion people who seek banking services from WSBI members every day.

It's news in a way, but it's also part of an evergreen story - WSBI's longstanding commitment to provide an 'Account to Everyone'. Twenty-five focus countries under the Universal Financial Access (UFA) need to address this most. We've set out through our member savings and retails banks to tackle the issue of the unbanked and underserved in 17.

Financial inclusion matters to an increasing number of players. With support of a sponsored Programme WSBI in 2008, wanted a fundamental question answered: what would it take to boost financial inclusion through the WSBI network of postal and savings banks? Driving WSBI's member support today to achieve the next set of UFA 2020 goals means taking lessons from this work on board.

The WSBI Programme aimed to increase formal savings services for poor people at 10 WSBI member banks across the globe. Active accounts swelled within five years from 1.2 million in 2008 to 2.8 million in 2015 in six of ten selected countries generating deep insights into the drivers and barriers of account usage.

Regular active account usage turned out to be much more difficult than first thought and account dormancy remained an elephant in the room. The core of the challenge was threefold: affordable pricing and low population densities put limits to the banks for providing a sustainable and accessible solution, plus there was a growing need to offer more convenient and intuitive services. Questions arose that demanded an answer. Two especially came to mind.

1. How do we add value to the way rural people already manage money informally?

Linking formal banking to village groups and replication the way people already manage money emerged as the most successful route to meet rural peoples' financial needs and close the proximity gap in remote Eastern Africa. Most of the cash in East Africa stays in villages, in a lot of places money circulates just within one kilometer of people's home and work, a member of a group would save $5-10 per month. Linkage banking with village groups became an arena to capture these high turnarounds of financial transactions and nontrivial amounts of savings.

WSBI member Postbank Uganda (PBU) adopted linkage banking in 2012: it linked its mobile banking platform not just to village groups but also to individual group members. PBU reaches out to 28,000 village groups so far. Without distorting the group model, PBU found a way to electronically replicate and link up with the group's existing savings and loan business. The result: a growing funding base and a threefold increase in PBU's active customer base.

2. How can segmentation of client data help us to predict people's' transactional behavior and address sustaining account activity after account opening?

Having a shared meaning of what defines an active account is paramount. WSBI's definition was any account that transacted in the previous six months. The Global Findex data shows a third of all adults doing any kind of saving during one year right up the development spectrum. Could it therefore be that customer's desired savings behavior to save occurs in bursts of activity followed by a quiet period before starting again and how much time passes between these periods?

WSBI member Kenya Post Office Savings Bank (KPOSB) developed an analytical model for the better understanding of the drivers of account activity. Together we looked at the periods when clients would normally reengage with the bank after a first contact has been made and whether getting messages out to clients by using local options could nudge their behaviour.

Trust in financial services offered to the unbanked an underserved depends hugely on the ability of service providers to invest time and resources into continuously gaining insights into the financial lives of the poor and translate these into convenient services. This takes time and can be costly, and it makes small-scale savings work much easier said than done. It's a journey where learning is a continuous process. Our newly produced video report highlights what bumps and discoveries we have found along the way.

The rise of mobile money in West Africa

04.04.2016Maimouna Gueye, Principal Financial Inclusion Officer, African Development Bank

It is of no doubt that Africa is being shaken by the volcanic digital revolution. Not surprisingly, the mobile money wave has crossed the sahelian band over to West Africa from its Kenyan birthplace.

A conducive policy and regulatory framework

Zooming in the WAEMU region comprised of francophone West Africa (Bénin, Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Guinea Bissau, Mali, Niger, Togo, Senegal), one could see it as a one-of-a-kind success story when it comes to conducive regulation triggering increased access of financial services for the poor. In 2006, the vision to foster economic growth through an improved state of access to financial services was part of the rationale for adopting an innovative regulation allowing non-bank players in the financial services market.

Building on the new regulatory framework and the integrated monetary and economic zone with regional payment systems, the regulator (BCEAO) opened consultations in 2007 with the banking sector and the member states for a "bancarisation" action plan in which every stakeholder was to implement a specific agenda aimed at improving the access and usage of bank accounts and electronic transactions.

Barriers to the upscale of mobile money

The granting of the first e-money licenses between 2007 and 2009 resulted in a timid surge of subscribers in the region. Barriers to access were still prominent and most banks were reluctant to embrace clientele with low purchasing power. In addition, very few innovative partnerships were initiated between mobile network operators, financial institutions and other private sector players. Besides, the few stand-alone e-money issuers encountered serious financial distress partly due to lack of sufficient revenue to cover the cost of building a wide network of agents.

The surge of mobile money

It is not until the end of the political unrest in Côte d'Ivoire in the year 2010 that the number of mobile money accounts started to take stride with 22 million users at the end of 2015, up from less than 3 million in 2010. At the end September 2015, users' performance revealed that 347 million transactions valued at close to 8.5 billion USD were accounted for in the region, with Côte d'Ivoire, Burkina Faso and Mali as the most dynamic markets. On average more than 1.2 million transactions were processed every day during that period.

Strikingly, digital cross border remittances are today increasingly dominating the traditional rapid money transfer services, particularly on corridors between Côte d'Ivoire and Burkina, Mali and Senegal, Togo and Benin. In addition, microfinance and government services are progressively being processed on digital wallets.

Aside from the enabling regulation, this speed of growth can be attributed to a dynamic and competitive market of over 33 deployments representing more than a quarter of the number of mobile money deployments on the continent. Overall, users are increasingly using mobile money as opposed to cash for financial transactions, which is the proof of a progressive acceptance of e-money as a means of payment.

A decade after the initial e-money regulation was adopted, access to financial services in the region has soared to 49.5%. When subtracting mobile money accounts, this rate merely reaches 30%.

Yet there is still more to do

Despite this progress, today's WAEMU market calls upon the necessity to evolve to a diversified range of financial services able to attract and retain users in the digital sphere. A large portion of the money deposited in the mobile wallets is cashed out and barely 40% of users are active. It would take sustainable and tailored service offerings that address the real demand for digital financial services for specific categories such as women, youth and rural consumers, before the WAEMU region can unlock its potential to achieve near universal financial inclusion given its assets.

The African Development Bank aims to achieve near universal access to financial services in Africa. In particular, the Financial Sector Policy and Strategy prioritizes digital solutions as the most promising approach to making those services affordable to the poor. Progress towards universal financial access in Africa requires action along a number of dimensions. These include: (i) Introduction of innovative pro-poor products and delivery mechanisms, services and business models that can deliver broad based financial services in economically viable ways; (ii) Core infrastructure that is sufficiently interoperable that these products and services can be linked not only within a country but across borders; and (c) Regulation and supervision that balance IT-enabled innovation, enhanced competition and protection of customers.

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About the Author

Maimouna Gueye is a digital finance expert with over 15 years of experience in the financial sector. She has solid experience in payment systems, digital financial services policy and regulation as well as oversight. She has significantly worked on financial inclusion in developing markets. She graduated with an MBA in Finance and Economics from Saint Peters University in the United States and is a fellow of the Fletcher School Leadership Program for Financial Inclusion funded by Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. After working for JP Morgan Chase and the Central Bank of West African States (BCEAO), Maimouna Gueye recently joined the African Development Bank as a Principal Financial Inclusion Officer in charge of funding a portfolio of projects targeting universal access to financial services for people in Africa

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